How to Create an Investor Deck

I’m working on creating an investor deck for my client, and I realized you guys might like to know what I’ve learned.

Here’s what’s changed over the past ten years or so: the focus in getting funding and presenting to investors has moved away from giant business plans and has been boiled down to a simple, succinct 10 slide deck. Think about it: if you’re an investor, would you want to read dozens of business plans each week? A good investor recognizes a good business concept when he sees it, so ten slides should be enough to give him a sense of the startup.

Here’s what VentureHacks says those slides should look like:

  1. Cover.
  2. Mission.
  3. Summary.
  4. Team.
  5. Problem.
  6. Solution.
  7. Technology.
  8. Marketing.
  9. Sales.
  10. Competition.
  11. Milestones.
  12. Conclusion.
  13. Financing.

I don’t want to go into too much detail on each slide, because I want to break them out into different posts. Or you can buy VentureHacks’ book, PitchingHacks: How to Pitch Investors. The PDF is affordable and an easy read.

Here’s a good example of an investor deck from ZapMeals:

But a few words on the deck itself. In case you don’t have an MBA, here are some points you need to know about designing PowerPoint slides:

  • keep it simple. they’re meant to be presented, so don’t include all text.
  • keep notes and speaking points separate.
  • each bullet should have no more than 7 words.
  • support info with charts and graphs.
  • high resolution images only!
  • go for sparse. the more clutter, the harder it is to process.

Getting Started

I’d recommend you do what I’m doing. Start with the outline of each slide above and jot down notes. Craft your wording until you’re happy with it. And since I’m not good at designing knock-em-dead slides, I will outsource the work to someone more talented. After all, if you want funding, isn’t it worth it to have a professional investor deck?

Here are some other resources to help you with your deck: