Variety of Companies Take on Fund-raising Efforts For Japan Tsunami Victims

There is no denying how the world will never forget the 8.9 magnitude earthquake followed by one of the most destructive tsunamis in recorded history that ravaged Japan last March 11.

The destruction caused by the tragedy left hundreds dead, with the numbers rising every day. Those who were lucky enough to survive the tragedy still face what seems to be a nightmare that never ends. Many are homeless, a lot of people are still unaccounted for, and there is an increasing lack of food and water supplies, not to mention the impending threat of a nuclear meltdown in one of the country’s power plants.

Nations have set the wheels in motion to lend a helping hand for Japan’s recovery measures, and many huge companies are already doing their fair share in raising funds and providing much-needed assistance.

Sony Corporation, a company that has a soft spot for the Tohoku region, as it has a number of their manufacturing sites, will be donating 300 million Japanese yen to aid relief and recovery efforts. They will also be putting together a disaster relief fund from Sony Group employees worldwide. In addition, the company will also be donating 30,000 Sony radios to further help out with recovery efforts.

Online deal sites like LivingSocial and Groupon are also participating in the campaign to provide financial assistance to the victims of the recent Japanese earthquake and tsunami tragedy.

Groupon has teamed up with the International Medical Corps, a group of health professionals that offer health care training, and most importantly relief and development programs. You can donate in increments of $5, $10, to $25. There’s more information about this here.

LivingSocial on the other hand has teamed up with GlobalGiving, a legitimate, online venue to find causes to donate to, to facilitate their fund-raising efforts. Their website and daily emails feature a link that users can click on to make their donations for the victims of the recent devastation in Japan.

Social networking Facebook, micro-blogging site Twitter, and search engine giant Google, all play a major role in furthering Japan’s relief and recovery measures as well.

Facebook‘s Causes function was used as a means for Red Cross to promote their donation campaign for Japan. Their initial goal was to raise $25,000 through the Causes app, but had raised this to $75,000 after having exceeded the 25,000 goal yesterday.

Twitter on the other hand, has already proven to be a great help as well, when it comes to relaying messages from the affected areas where no communication is possible via phone lines. Through their Hashtags feature, you can find information about evacuations, medical updates, and much more.

Google’s most popular means of assistance to Japan in the midst of the massive destruction caused by the earthquake and tsunami, is their Person Finder feature. The search engine giant has also set up a Google Crisis Response page that has a variety of helpful links like message boards, alarm and warning sites, among many others.

The tragedy has touched so many hearts, that even gaming companies like Zynga, and online music marketplace iTunes, are doing their best in coming up with more financial aid for Japan.

Zynga offers an interactive means of helping out by means of their online games. Cityville users can opt to plant a special edition of sweet potato crop, or purchase a variety of virtual items through games like FrontierVille and Cafe World, with 100% of the purchase price going to the Save the Children’s Japan Earthquake Tsunami Children Emergency Fund.

iTunes in turn has set up an option on their site for their users to make use of to donate to Red Cross’ fund-raising efforts for the victims of the massive 8.9 magnitude earthquake and tsunami in Japan. You can donate in increments of $5, $10, $25, $50, $100 and $200.

So, if you think you can do more to help, you can actually start by just clicking on a couple of links, as there are a variety of digital ways to help the affected areas in Japan get back on their feet.