Not Working With Female Bloggers Yet? You’re Missing a Huge Market

Stern Woman Blogger

I’ve long been an advocate of brands working with bloggers. Every blog has an audience of readers who trust the blogger’s opinion, and often they trust the blogger more than traditional advertising.

I recently attended BlogHer, a conference for female bloggers, and a session proved that I am right:

According to a Nielson study, blogs by women are the most valued source for information, beating both corporate sites and social networks.

Blogs are more than two times more likely than magazines to have inspired a beauty-product purchase over the past six months (63 percent versus 26 percent).

Women are just as likely to trust beauty-product advice from a parenting (43 percent), health (42 percent), or lifestyle (37 percent) blog, as from a beauty and fashion blog (43 percent). (DeVries/BlogHer study)

Whereas when I attended BlogHer in 2008, when “mommy bloggers” was an up-and-coming term that brands didn’t have a clue what to do with, these days, the power of the female blogger is being noticed by brands, large and small.

Working with Bloggers

Not sure what you’re supposed to do with bloggers? Female, male or otherwise, they are your key to reaching more customers. Here’s what’s happening in the industry:

  • Brands give bloggers products to try and write unbiased reviews about.
  • Brands give bloggers products to give away.
  • Brands retain the services of bloggers to blog, Tweet and post about their products on social media sites.
  • Brands work with bloggers to hold community events.
  • Brands invite bloggers to participate on panels to share their opinions.

There are unlimited ways you can partner with a blogger. Focus on finding the ones who are already singing your praises, as they’ll be the most excited to work with you. And remember: their time is valuable. Fewer and fewer bloggers are willing to work for cookies, so to speak. Just because you compensate them doesn’t mean you’re skewing their opinions of your brand. You’re simply compensating them for the time they work with you.

Photo: Flickr user Mike Licht, NotionsCapital.com. Creative Commons 2.0.